Allergy symptoms – Deserved Health http://deservedhealth.com/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 13:06:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://deservedhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Allergy symptoms – Deserved Health http://deservedhealth.com/ 32 32 Azelastine HCI 0.15% Nasal Spray quickly relieves seasonal allergy symptoms https://deservedhealth.com/azelastine-hci-0-15-nasal-spray-quickly-relieves-seasonal-allergy-symptoms/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 13:06:00 +0000 https://deservedhealth.com/azelastine-hci-0-15-nasal-spray-quickly-relieves-seasonal-allergy-symptoms/ Azelastine HCl 0.15% Nasal Spray has shown rapid onset of action in relieving nasal symptoms of Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis (SAR). It was also well tolerated and without safety concerns, according to study results presented at the 2022 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting, held from May 10 to November 14 […]]]>

Azelastine HCl 0.15% Nasal Spray has shown rapid onset of action in relieving nasal symptoms of Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis (SAR). It was also well tolerated and without safety concerns, according to study results presented at the 2022 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific Meeting, held from May 10 to November 14 in Louisville, Kentucky.

Researchers assessed how quickly azelastine hydrochloride 0.15% could relieve nasal symptoms of RSA. The primary endpoint was the time from baseline to onset of azelastine usefulness, which the researchers assessed by comparing azelastine and placebo for change from baseline. baseline of total nasal symptom score.

Researchers conducted a single-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled study with 110 adult participants (ages 18-65), who were randomly assigned to receive 0.15% azelastine hydrochloride or spray nasal placebo after continuous exposure to ragweed pollen in an environmental exposure chamber.

The researchers found a statistically significant improvement in total nasal symptom scores in the azelastine group compared to the placebo group starting at 30 minutes post-dose (P =.0002). This effect was maintained for 240 minutes after administration (P =.0001). The adverse events (AEs) matched the known safety profile, and none of the AEs were serious, the study authors reported.

The researchers concluded that “Azelastine HCl 0.15% Nasal Spray was well tolerated and there were no safety issues raised during this SAR study.” They added that “the rapid onset of action for allergy symptom relief combined with a safe side effect profile indicates that Azelastine Hydrochloride 0.15% is a valuable treatment option for allergic rhinitis. “.

Reference

Hsu S, Stevens D, Sajjad F, Salapatek A. Onset of Action of Azelastine HCl Nasal Spray 0.15% Evaluated in an Environmental Exposure Chamber. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2022;125(5):S71. doi:10.1016/j.anai.2022.08.704

]]>
Adding Tezepelumab to SCIT to Improve Cat Allergy Symptoms? https://deservedhealth.com/adding-tezepelumab-to-scit-to-improve-cat-allergy-symptoms/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 19:30:00 +0000 https://deservedhealth.com/adding-tezepelumab-to-scit-to-improve-cat-allergy-symptoms/ The asthma medication zepelumabadded to subcutaneous immunotherapy treatment (SCIT), may provide better and longer lasting symptom relief than allergy injections alone for patients with allergic rhinitis caused by cat allergens, based on Phase 1/2 results clinical test. “One year of allergen immunotherapy [AIT] combined with tzepelumab was significantly more effective than SCIT alone in reducing […]]]>

The asthma medication zepelumabadded to subcutaneous immunotherapy treatment (SCIT), may provide better and longer lasting symptom relief than allergy injections alone for patients with allergic rhinitis caused by cat allergens, based on Phase 1/2 results clinical test.

“One year of allergen immunotherapy [AIT] combined with tzepelumab was significantly more effective than SCIT alone in reducing the nasal response to allergen provocation at the end of treatment and one year after discontinuation of treatment,” said study lead author Jonathan Corren. , MD, from the University’s David Geffen School of Medicine. of California, Los Angeles, and his colleagues write in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

“This persistent improvement in clinical response was accompanied by reductions in nasal transcripts for several immunological pathways, including mast cell activation.”

The study was cited in a Press release from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) who said the approach could work similarly with other allergens.

The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently tézepelumab approved for the treatment of severe asthma in persons aged 12 years and over. Tezelumab, a monoclonal antibody, works by blocking thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP).

“Cells that line the surface of organs like the skin and intestines or that line the inside of the nose and lungs rapidly secrete TSLP in response to signals of potential danger,” according to the NIH press release. “In allergic diseases, TSLP helps initiate an excessive immune response to otherwise harmless substances like cat dander, causing inflammation of the airways that results in the symptoms of allergic rhinitis.”

Test an improved strategy

The double-blind CATNIP trial was conducted by Corren and colleagues at nine sites in the United States. The trial included patients aged 18 to 65 who had had moderate to severe cat-induced allergic rhinitis for at least 2 years from 2015 to 2019.

The researchers excluded patients with recurrent acute or chronic sinusitis. They excluded patients who had experienced SCIT with a cat allergen in the past 10 years or sensitivity to seasonal or perennial allergens during nasal provocations. They also excluded people with a history of persistent asthma.

In the parallel design study, 121 participants were randomly assigned to four groups: 32 patients were treated with intravenous tezepelumab plus cat SCIT, 31 received the allergy shots alone, 30 received tezepelumab alone and 28 received placebo alone for 52 weeks, followed by 52 weeks of observation.

Participants received SCIT (10,000 bioequivalent allergy units [BAU] per milliliter) or matched placebo via weekly subcutaneous injections in increasing doses for approximately 12 weeks, followed by monthly maintenance injections (4000 BAU or maximum tolerated dose) until week 48.

They received tzepelumab (700 mg IV) or matching placebo 1–3 days before SCIT injections or SCIT placebo once every 4 weeks through week 24, then before or on the same day as SCIT injections or placebo until week 48.

Efficiency measures

Participants also received nasal allergy challenges – a spritz of a nasal spray containing cat allergen extract into each nostril at screening, baseline, and weeks 26, 52, 78, and 104. The researchers recorded the participants’ total nasal symptom score (TNSS) and peak nasal inspiratory flow at 5, 15, 30 and 60 minutes after the spray and every hour until 6 hours after the challenge. Blood and nasal cell samples were also taken.

The research team performed skin testing using serial dilutions of cat extract and an intradermal skin test (IDST) using the concentration of allergen that produced an early response of at least 15mm at baseline. . They measured the early phase responses for both tests at 15 minutes and the late phase response to the IDST at 6 hours.

They measured serum levels of cat dander-specific IgE, IgG4, and total IgE using a fluorinated enzyme immunoassay. They measured serum IL-5 and IL-13 using a high-sensitivity single-molecule digital immunoassay and performed nasal brushing using a 3 mm cytology brush 6 hours after a nasal allergy. They performed whole-genome transcriptional profiling on the extracted RNA.

Combination therapy worked better and longer

Combination therapy worked best during its administration. Although the allergy shots alone stopped working after they were stopped, the combination continued to benefit participants 1 year after this therapy ended.

  • At week 52, statistically significant reductions in TNSS induced by nasal allergic provocations occurred in patients receiving tezepelumab plus SCIT compared to patients receiving SCIT alone.

  • At week 104, 1 year after the end of treatment, the primary endpoint of TNSS was not significantly different in the tzepelumab plus SCIT group than in the SCIT alone group, but the peak TNSS 0-1 hour was significantly lower in the combined treatment group than in the SCIT alone group. in the SCIT group alone.

  • In gene expression analysis from nasal epithelial samples, participants who had been treated with the combination but not with either therapy by themselves showed persistent modulation of nasal immunological environment, including decreased mast cell function. This is largely explained by a decrease in the transcription of the gene TPSAB1 (tryptase). Tryptase protein in nasal fluid also decreased in the combined group compared to the SCIT alone group.

  • Adverse and serious events, including infections and infestations as well as respiratory, thoracic, mediastinal, gastrointestinal, immune system and nervous system disorders, did not differ significantly between treatment groups.

Four independent experts hail the results

Patricia Lynne Lugar, MD, associate professor of medicine in the Division of Respirology, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine at Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, found the results, particularly the durability of the one-year post-treatment response, surprising .


Dr. Patricia Lynne Lugar

“AIT is a very effective treatment that often provides prolonged symptom improvement and is ‘curative’ in many cases,” she said. Medscape Medical News by email. “If further studies show that tezepelumab offers long-term results, more patients may opt for combination therapy.

“An important strength of the study is its assessment of combination therapy responses on cell production and gene expression,” Lugar added. “The mechanism by which AIT modulates the allergic response is widely understood. Tezepelumab may augment this modulation to alter the Th2 response upon allergen exposure.”

Will payers cover the prohibitively expensive biologic?

Scott Frank, MD, associate professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, Ohio, called the study well-designed and rigorous.



Doctor Scott Frank

“The practicality of the approach may be limited by the need for intravenous administration of tezepelumab in addition to the traditional allergy vaccine,” he noted via email, “and the cost of this therapeutic approach does not is not addressed”.

Christopher Brooks, MD, clinical assistant professor of allergy and immunology in the department of otolaryngology at Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio, also pointed to the drug’s cost.



Dr Christopher Brooks

“Tezepelumab is currently an expensive biologic drug, so it remains to be seen whether patients and payers will be willing to pay for this complementary drug when AIT itself is still very effective,” he said. by email.

“AIT is most effective when given for 5 years, so it also remains to be seen whether the results and conclusions of this study would still be valid if performed during the typical treatment period of 5 years,” he added.



Dr Stokes Peebles

Stokes Peebles, MD, professor of medicine in the Division of Allergy, Pulmonary, and Critical Care Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee, called the study “very well designed by a group of highly respected researchers using well-matched studies populations.

“Tezepelumab has been shown to work in asthma, and there’s no reason to think it wouldn’t work in allergic rhinitis,” he said in a phone interview.

“However, while the results of the combination therapy were statistically significant, their clinical significance was unclear. Patients don’t care about statistical significance. They want to know if a drug will be clinically significant,” he said. he adds.

Many people avoid cat allergy symptoms by avoiding cats and, in some cases, avoiding people who live with cats, he said. Medical therapy, usually involving nasal corticosteroids and antihistamines, helps most people avoid cat allergy symptoms.

“Patients with bad allergies who have not done well with SCIT may consider adding tzepelumab, but this comes at a significant cost. If medical treatment does not work, allergy shots are available at around 3 $000 a year. Adding tezepelumab costs about $40,000 more a year,” he explained. “Does the slight clinical benefit justify the greatly increased cost?” »

The authors and uninvolved experts recommend further related research.

The research was supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health. AstraZeneca and Amgen donated the drug used in the study. Corren reports financial relationships with AstraZeneca, and a co-author reports relevant financial relationships with Amgen and other pharmaceutical companies. The remaining co-authors report no relevant financial relationships.

J Allergy Clin Immunol. Published online October 9, 2022. Summary

For more information, follow Medscape on Facebook, Twitter, instagramand Youtube.

]]>
Symptoms, triggers, what to avoid https://deservedhealth.com/symptoms-triggers-what-to-avoid/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 14:22:21 +0000 https://deservedhealth.com/symptoms-triggers-what-to-avoid/ Salicylates are natural chemicals produced by plants to protect them against disease and environmental stress. They are present in many foods, cosmetics and medicines, such as aspirin. Although salicylates are generally well tolerated, they can cause significant reactions in people with allergies. This article will review the symptoms and causes of a salicylate allergy. He […]]]>

Salicylates are natural chemicals produced by plants to protect them against disease and environmental stress. They are present in many foods, cosmetics and medicines, such as aspirin.

Although salicylates are generally well tolerated, they can cause significant reactions in people with allergies.

This article will review the symptoms and causes of a salicylate allergy. He will also discuss testing, treatment, and foods to avoid.

Randy Faris/Getty Images


What is a salicylate allergy?

A salicylate allergy, sometimes incorrectly called salicylate intolerance, is a reaction that occurs when a person comes into contact with salicylates.

Salicylate allergies can be difficult to diagnose because salicylates are found in a wide variety of food and non-food products.

Medications such as Pepto-Bismol (bismuth subsalicylate) and aspirin which contain high amounts of synthetic salicylates appear to be closely linked to many salicylate allergies and intolerances.

It is important to note that allergies and intolerances to salicylates are different. Although an allergy to salicylates is a immune system a reaction which can be serious, a salicylate intolerance refers to the way the product is broken down in your system and can cause gastrointestinal effects.

Although there is some data to suggest that foods high in salicylates may also cause a reaction, very little research confirms this.

Can a person sensitive or allergic to aspirin consume salicylates in food?

Many aspirin-sensitive people can eat foods containing salicylates without difficulty. This is because aspirin contains a molecule called the acetyl group that natural salicylic acid does not have.

Symptoms

Symptoms of a salicylate allergy can include:

  • Itchy, watery eyes
  • Vomiting
  • stomach cramps
  • Urticaria
  • Runny nose
  • To sneeze
  • To cough
  • Diarrhea
  • Stun
  • Wheezing
  • Skin color changes

Severe reactions can lead to a life-threatening condition called anaphylaxis.

causes

The cause of salicylic allergies remains unknown. However, true allergic reactions occur when the immune system overreacts to harmless substances called allergens.

When an allergic person comes into contact with an allergen, their immune system produces antibodies called immunoglobulin E (IgE) to attack the allergen. These antibodies then travel to the cells which release a number of chemicals, triggering an allergic reaction.

Risk factors

Having asthma or a family history of allergies puts you at a higher risk of developing allergies, but the reasons why some people develop drug allergies and others do not are not well understood.

People with chronic rhinosinusitis may also experience an increase in symptoms after consuming products potentially high in salicylates.

What to avoid

If you have a salicylates allergy, ask your healthcare provider if you should avoid certain foods, products, and ingredients that contain salicylates.

List of foods

Every person allergic to salicylates is different. Avoiding all salicylate-containing foods is difficult and may not be necessary – you may be able to tolerate and enjoy them. Talk to your healthcare provider about whether you should eliminate foods containing salicylates from your diet, which may include:

  • Vegetables: Broccoli, cauliflower, spinach, cucumber, mushrooms, radish, eggplant and peppers.
  • Fruit: Blueberries, avocado, prunes, grapefruit, strawberries, cherries, peaches, plums, raspberries, figs, kiwis and apples,
  • Herbs and spices: Cayenne, cinnamon, clove, thyme, rosemary, paprika, curry powder, cumin, oregano and turmeric.
  • Beverages: Tea, wine, rum, beer, orange juice, apple cider, sherry and coffee.
  • Seasoning: Soy sauce, jellies and jams, vinegar, tomato sauce, tomato paste and honey.
  • Other Food Sources: Gelatin, ice cream, mints, licorice, peanuts, almonds, pistachios, certain cheeses, chewing gum, pickles, water chestnuts and olives.

Products List

Since salicylates can be absorbed through the skin, ask your healthcare provider if you should avoid certain products containing salicylates.

These include:

  • Perfumes and scents
  • Shampoos and conditioner
  • lotions
  • Shaving cream
  • Alka Seltzer
  • Solar cream
  • Beauty products
  • Pepto-Bismol
  • Ibuprofen
  • Aspirin

List of products containing salicylate

To make sure you don’t get accidentally exposed, you should carefully read the ingredient labels of your products that may contain salicylate.

Ingredients containing salicylate include:

  • Acetylsalicylic acid
  • Fruit flavors
  • Food coloring
  • Benzyl salicylate
  • Green mint
  • Phenylethyl salicylate
  • Salicylic acid
  • Magnesium salicylate
  • Sodium salicylate

How to Test for Salicylate Allergy

Currently, there is no reliable test to diagnose salicylate allergy. However, some allergy tests methods can help rule out an allergy to salicylates.

For example, your health care provider, including an allergist (a doctor who specializes in the diagnosis, treatment, and management of allergies), may perform an exposure or provocation test. In this test, you are exposed to small amounts of salicylic acid and monitored until an allergic reaction occurs or is ruled out.

An allergist may ask you for your detailed medical history and ask you to keep a food diary Diagnose an allergy to salicylated foods.

If an allergy is suspected, you may be asked to perform an oral food challenge, which involves eating small amounts of food containing the allergen under close medical supervision.

How to Treat a Salicylate Allergy

Allergy treatment depends on several factors, including the results of your allergy tests and the severity of your symptoms.

The most effective treatment for a salicylate allergy is to avoid salicylate. However, it is not easy due to its widespread use in foods, beauty products and medicines.

Food allergic reactions that produce minor symptoms often go away on their own. Over-the-counter (OTC) antihistamines can be taken to treat mild symptoms.

Types of antihistamines include:

For severe reactions, such as difficulty breathing or hives that develop all over your body, you should use a epinephrine injection (EpiPen), which is the only effective treatment for anaphylaxis. It should be administered within minutes of the onset of severe symptoms.

Summary

Salicylates are found in a wide range of foods, beauty products, and medications. Although they are considered safe and generally well tolerated, some people may be sensitive or allergic to them.

A person with a true salicylate allergy may be advised to avoid foods and non-food items containing high amounts of salicylates. This decision should be made after talking to your doctor or allergist.

At present, very little is known about an allergy to salicylates. Its diagnosis is often difficult to make. If you think you have a salicylates allergy, it’s important to speak with your health care provider for a proper diagnosis.

A word from Verywell

Salicylates are found in many foods and other products. For this reason, it can be difficult to manage an allergy. What may trigger one person may not trigger another. If you have a salicylate allergy, it’s a good idea to keep antihistamines and an EpiPen on hand. It’s also important to work closely with your healthcare team to develop a personalized treatment plan.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What foods are high in salicylates?

    Foods high in salicylates include broccoli, cauliflower, radishes, blueberries, avocados, pine nuts, coffee, and nightshade vegetables, such as eggplant and bell peppers.

  • What are the side effects of salicylate?

    In most people, salicylate does not cause any harmful side effects. However, people allergic or sensitive to salicylate may experience asthma-like symptoms, nasal congestion, itching, rash, runny nose, or hives.

  • Can you overcome a salicylate allergy?

    Like most allergies, there is no cure for a true salicylate allergy. The best way to treat it is to avoid salicylates. Effective treatments are available to control the symptoms.

]]>
Symptoms, Substitutes and What to Avoid https://deservedhealth.com/symptoms-substitutes-and-what-to-avoid/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 20:19:34 +0000 https://deservedhealth.com/symptoms-substitutes-and-what-to-avoid/ quinoa is a type of seed that has a grain-like texture. Although it is considered an ancient crop grown in South America, it has become more popular lately due to its high nutritional value and potential health benefits, durability, and gluten-free properties. It provides many nutrients such as protein, heart-healthy fats, fiber, iron, antioxidants, and […]]]>

quinoa is a type of seed that has a grain-like texture. Although it is considered an ancient crop grown in South America, it has become more popular lately due to its high nutritional value and potential health benefits, durability, and gluten-free properties. It provides many nutrients such as protein, heart-healthy fats, fiber, iron, antioxidants, and potassium.

Although a quinoa allergy is not common, some people are sensitive to saponin, a natural chemical found on the outside of the quinoa seed. This article will discuss the symptoms of a quinoa or saponin allergy, diagnosis, treatment, and alternatives if quinoa needs to be eliminated from your diet.

letterberry / Getty Images


Symptoms

Symptoms of a quinoa allergy can include food allergy symptoms and reactions such as:

  • Skin: Urticaria, eczemaswelling around the lips or mouth
  • Stomach or intestinal: Upset stomach, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting or diarrhea
  • Eyes: Redness, itching, tearing and swelling
  • Airway: wheezing, coughing, runny nose or difficulty swallowing (these symptoms can also be a sign of a life-threatening reaction called anaphylaxis)

Anaphylaxis

Anaphylaxis is a serious, life-threatening medical condition with common symptoms of:

  • Pale skin color
  • Urticaria
  • Itching
  • Wheezing, shortness of breathor out of breath
  • Low blood pressure
  • Unable to pronounce more than one or two words
  • Pursing her lips to breathe
  • Use neck muscles to breathe

If you experience symptoms of anaphylaxis after consuming quinoa, seek medical attention immediately. 911 should be called for emergency treatment.

Link between quinoa allergy and saponin

There are very few reports of allergic reactions to quinoa in medical journals. Based on the limited studies available, researchers hypothesize that allergic reactions to quinoa may in fact be caused by saponin, the natural chemical that coats the quinoa seed.

Store-bought quinoa is usually pre-rinsed, which helps remove all or most of the saponin. However, it’s still a good idea to soak, rinse, and wash the quinoa to help remove any remaining saponin residue. Rinsing quinoa can also help remove its bitter taste and help the body better absorb the nutrients from the seed.

More Foods Containing Saponin

Saponin is also found in legumes, lentils, and chickpeas, so you should always wash and rinse these foods well before consuming them.

Diagnostic

If you suspect a food allergy, use a diary to keep track of the foods you eat and note when you experience symptoms. Although quinoa allergy is very rare, it is possible. Always consult a medical professional such as an allergist or immunologist to confirm your allergy. Diagnose Food Allergies may include multiple tests. The most common allergy tests are skin tests and blood tests.

Treatment

The standard treatment for food allergy is not to eat the foods you are allergic to.

However, if you accidentally consume quinoa and experience a mild to moderate reaction, you can take an over-the-counter (OTC) medication to relieve symptoms, such as antihistamines. If your reaction is severe, such as anaphylaxis (a whole-body immune response), get medical help right away. 911 should be called for emergency treatment.

If you are not allergic to quinoa but sensitive to saponins, wash the quinoa thoroughly before eating it. There are different food processing techniques manufacturers use to remove saponin from quinoa that can remove more saponin, such as pre-rinsing. The reference to the quinoa packet will help ensure the proper cleaning and cooking process.

What to avoid

If you think you may be allergic to quinoa, it’s best to eliminate or avoid the food until you see a healthcare professional for a proper allergy diagnosis.

Quinoa can be added to many different foods due to its nutritional benefits, including its high protein and fiber content. Quinoa is sometimes used alone as an accompaniment, however, since it is a neutral-tasting food, it is an ingredient that can hide in:

  • Bread
  • Cereal
  • Granola bars
  • Smoothies
  • Vegetable protein powders

It is important to know how to read an ingredient label for food allergies carefully to confirm if the ingredient has been added. If you’re eating out, tell the server about your allergy and ask them to check if quinoa is incorporated into the dish before ordering.

Cross-reactivity

If you are allergic to quinoa or saponins, there is a small chance that other foods containing similar proteins may also produce an allergic reaction due to cross-reactivity. There isn’t much research to substantiate which foods can cross-react with quinoa. One study has shown cross-reactivity with peanuts and tree nuts. However, this study was performed on rats, so its results may not be applicable to humans.

What is cross-reactivity?

Cross-reactivity occurs when two foods that look different contain similar proteins, which can cause an allergic reaction to both. An allergist or immunologist can help diagnose these allergies and/or complicated reactions.

Quinoa Substitutes

There are several quinoa substitutes. Since quinoa has a mild, slightly nutty flavor and a light, chewy texture, you can use any of these ingredients in place of quinoa in a recipe:

  • Rice: All forms of rice are gluten-free and make an excellent quinoa substitute as they have a neutral taste and similar nutritional value when it comes to fiber and calories. Even though rice is not a complete protein like quinoa, protein sources can be added such as meat or beans to increase the protein content.
  • Barley: Barley is a whole grain and contains gluten. It has a nutty flavor similar to quinoa, which means it’s a great taste substitute, but it’s not for those who have celiac disease. Barley also contains nutrients like fiber and potassium.
  • Couscous: Couscous is a meal made from semolina. Semolina is a form of wheat, which makes couscous not gluten-free. Couscous has a pearl shape and a texture similar to quinoa. Those who don’t have celiac disease can use couscous in a dish as a quinoa substitute. Couscous contains many vitamins and minerals.

When to See a Health Care Provider

If you have any of the symptoms of food allergies, you should contact your health care team to receive a proper diagnosis. If you have symptoms of anaphylaxis, seek medical attention immediately. 911 should be called for emergency treatment.

Summary

Quinoa is a uniquely nutty, nutrient-dense food. It is a plant source of complete protein and contains all nine essential amino acids. Although quinoa allergies are very rare, food allergies can occur with any food, and care should be taken in case you experience food allergy symptoms.

There are many possible substitutes for quinoa, including rice which is also gluten-free, or couscous or barley which contain gluten. If you have a food allergy, it is important to contact your health care provider immediately.

A word from Verywell

Food allergies can cause a frightening reaction and it is sometimes difficult to determine the cause of the symptoms. Learning which allergy symptoms to know and how to quickly treat an allergic reaction can be empowering.

You can also practice reading ingredient labels or telling servers about your food allergies when eating out. In addition to seeing a healthcare professional, support can be found in groups (in person or virtually) through the Food Allergy Research and Education Organization (FARE).

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Is quinoa allergy common in children?

    Quinoa allergies are very rare. Overall, food allergy symptoms are more likely to appear in children and babies, but can occur at any age.

  • Does quinoa contain histamine?


  • Does quinoa cause gas and upset stomach?

    Allergic reaction symptoms may present as stomach or intestinal reactions, such as upset stomach, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting or diarrhea. If you are allergic to quinoa, you may experience these symptoms and need to see your doctor.

Verywell Health uses only high quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts in our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact check and ensure our content is accurate, reliable and trustworthy.

  1. Nutritional and Health Benefits of Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.). Journal of Cereal Science. 2016;69:371-376. doi:10.1016/j.jcs.2016.05.004

  2. Boyce JA, Assa’ad A, Burks AW, et al. Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Food Allergies in the United States: Report of the NIAID-Sponsored Expert Panel. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2010;126(6 suppl.):S1-58. do I:10.1016/j.jaci.2010.10.007

  3. American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Food Allergy – Symptoms and Diagnosis

  4. Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE). Symptoms of an allergic reaction to food.

  5. American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Anaphylaxis.

  6. Shi J, Arunasalam K, Yeung D, Kakuda Y, Mittal G, Jiang Y. Edible Legume Saponins: Chemistry, Processing, and Health Benefits. J-Med Food. 2004;7(1):67-78. doi: 10.1089/109662004322984734

  7. Gunay Seyda CSS. Is it really a superfood? Quinoa and its effects on cardiovascular risk factors. ijmhs. 1970;9(4):408-412. do I: 10.15520/ijmhs.v9i4.2555

  8. El Hazzam K, Hafsa J, Sobeh M, et al. An Overview of Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd) Saponins: A Review. Molecules. 2020;25(5):1059. doi:10.3390/molecules25051059

  9. Quinoa allergenicity – identification of sensitizing and cross-reacting quinoa proteins – DTU Findit.

  10. American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Definition of cross-reactivity.

  11. American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Food allergy.

By Rebecca Valdez, MS, RDN

Rebecca Valdez is a registered dietitian nutritionist and nutrition communication consultant, passionate about food justice, equity and sustainability.

]]>
Symptoms, what to avoid and more https://deservedhealth.com/symptoms-what-to-avoid-and-more-8/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 20:15:49 +0000 https://deservedhealth.com/symptoms-what-to-avoid-and-more-8/ Eggplant is a plant in the nightshade family, also known as the nightshade family. Although botanically a fruit, eggplants are commonly eaten as a vegetable in savory dishes. They are used in many cuisines around the world and often touted for their versatility, especially as a meat replacement. A very small number of people can […]]]>

Eggplant is a plant in the nightshade family, also known as the nightshade family. Although botanically a fruit, eggplants are commonly eaten as a vegetable in savory dishes. They are used in many cuisines around the world and often touted for their versatility, especially as a meat replacement.

A very small number of people can develop an eggplant allergy. Although this allergy is very rare, it can lead to discomfort and even serious bodily reactions in severe cases. Some people are even allergic or intolerant to all members of the nightshade family.

Learn more about the signs and symptoms of an eggplant allergy, how to treat it, foods to avoid, and some suggested eggplant alternatives.

Photo Agnes Elisabeth Szucs/Getty Images


Symptoms

A allergic reaction to eggplant looks like allergic reactions to other foods. Common symptoms include:

  • Rashes
  • Itchy and swollen throat
  • Itchy and red eyes
  • Nausea and vomiting

In severe cases, food allergies can cause anaphylaxis, a life-threatening allergic reaction that requires immediate medical attention. Symptoms of anaphylaxis include:

  • Urticaria
  • Shortness of breath
  • Wheezing
  • Swelling of the lips, tongue or throat
  • Low blood pressure

Risk factors

In general, the main cause of allergies is genes. A person’s gender, race, and age can also affect the incidence and prevalence of allergies. Exposure to certain allergens, socioeconomic factors, comorbidities (concomitant conditions), climatic zone, and dietary habits can also influence allergies.

Your risk of eggplant allergy may increase if you have:

  • Allergies to other members of the nightshade family, such as tomatoes, potatoes, and peppers
  • Sensitivity to salicylate, a component of aspirin found in eggplant
  • A latex allergy, although rare (one report has been recorded of eggplant anaphylaxis in a single latex allergic patient)
  • Oral Allergy Syndrome (OAS)a condition that is different from food allergies

OAS is characterized by an increased sensitivity to certain foods, mainly fruits and vegetables, after exposure to an allergen to which you are sensitive, such as trees, flowers or dust. OAS usually only has oral involvement (including the lips, mouth, tongue, and throat). Some cases of eggplant allergy have been reported to be associated with OAS, due to cross-reactions with pollen, latex, or even other vegetables, such as potato.

Diagnostic

Use a diary to track your diet and note when you experience symptoms. If you find that you experience sensations such as itching, rash or nausea immediately after eating eggplant dishes, an allergy may be to blame. Developing a rash a few days after eating eggplant does not indicate an eggplant food allergy.

If you suspect an eggplant allergy, see your healthcare provider for a referral to an allergy specialist, who may be able to perform tests to confirm the allergy. Common allergy tests include:

  • Skin test: During this test, your doctor will place a drop of the allergen on your skin and scrape it off. After several minutes, if there is a reaction such as redness, swelling, or itching, an allergy is likely.
  • Blood test: A blood test for allergies looks for an antibody called immunoglobulin E (IgE), which your body produces when exposed to an allergen.

Treatment of food allergies

The standard treatment for most food allergies is to avoid the allergen. This means that you should not eat eggplant or foods containing eggplant.

Your health care provider may prescribe certain medications for you to take in case you accidentally eat eggplant and have an allergic reaction. For a minor allergic reaction, a antihistaminesuch as Benadryl (diphenhydramine) or Claritin (loratadine) can be used.

During an allergic reaction, your body releases compounds called histamines that cause symptoms of itching, sneezing, and watery eyes. Antihistamines block the histamine receptor, minimizing these symptoms.

In the most serious cases, a EpiPen may be prescribed to prevent and treat anaphylaxis. EpiPens are injectable forms of epinephrine, used to stop the life-threatening whole body reaction that can occur. Knowing when and how to use an EpiPen is important because it can save lives when used correctly.

Always carry your EpiPen with you

If you are diagnosed with a food allergy, it is essential to always carry your EpiPen with you.

What to avoid

If you find out you have an eggplant allergy, the best thing to do is avoid eggplant. Eggplant is commonly used as a meat substitute, so be careful when ordering vegetarian or vegan dishes in restaurants. Tell your server that you have an eggplant allergy just to be on the safe side. Eggplant is used in cuisines around the world, so familiarize yourself with popular eggplant dishes. Some dishes that often contain eggplant include:

  • Baba ghanoush
  • Ratatouille
  • Eggplant Parmesan
  • Pasta a la Norma
  • caponata
  • Moussaka

Know Your Nightshade Foods

If you’re allergic to eggplant, it doesn’t automatically mean you’re allergic to other foods in the nightshade family, but it is a possibility. Here are some other nightshade foods you should know about:

  • Tomatoes
  • Potatoes
  • Peppers
  • peppers
  • Goji berries
  • blueberries
  • Tomatillos
  • Cayenne pepper
  • Chilli flakes
  • chili powder
  • Paprika

Food alternatives

Fortunately, avoiding eggplant is relatively easy once you know which dishes contain it. Other vegetables such as mushrooms, okra, root vegetables, carrots, tomatoes, and peppers can be used in place of eggplant in stews, stir-fries, and stir-fries, but if you are also allergic to nightshades, you can’t eat them either. Zucchini can be a great substitute for eggplant in dishes like eggplant parmesan or grilled salads.

Summary

Eggplant allergies are rare. All allergies can cause discomfort and even severe reactions. If you notice itching, swelling, rashes, or nausea immediately after eating eggplant, you may be allergic. If you experience symptoms of anaphylaxis, such as shortness of breath, wheezing, or swelling in your throat, seek medical attention immediately.

Eggplant allergies can be managed by familiarizing yourself with dishes containing eggplant and replacing eggplant with other foods, such as mushrooms and zucchini.

A word from Verywell

Food allergies can be frustrating to manage and can cause anxiety, especially when sharing meals or dining out. However, knowing more about your allergy and what foods to avoid can help you feel empowered and in control.

If you think you have a food allergy, talk to your healthcare provider about getting tested so you can be confident when choosing foods to cook at home or eat out.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Why do eggplants make my mouth itch?

    If eggplant makes your mouth itch, you might be allergic to eggplant.

    Itchy mouth can occur as a symptom of OAS, which usually resolves on its own – no EpiPen required. VS symptoms can also be managed by eating canned foods or cooking them before eating them.

    Itchy mouth can also occur with systemic allergic reactions, which requires a different treatment plan: strictly avoid foods you’re allergic to, regardless of how they’re prepared, and always carry your EpiPen with you.

    If your mouth is itchy immediately after eating a food, talk to your health care provider and take an allergy test to confirm the cause of your symptoms.

  • Are eggplants high in histamine?

    Eggplants contain histamine, the chemical responsible for allergy symptoms such as itchy eyes, sneezing and congestion. However, histamine in foods, including eggplant, varies and is generally not at levels that would cause a spontaneous allergic reaction in most individuals.

    Skin tests may be inaccurate when testing for histamine in eggplant.

  • What are the symptoms of nightshade food intolerance?

    Nightshade intolerance can produce symptoms such as bloating, gas, heartburn, nausea, and diarrhea after eating foods from the nightshade family, such as eggplant, potato, tomato, and pepper.

]]>
Wheat Allergy: Symptoms, Triggers, and Tips https://deservedhealth.com/wheat-allergy-symptoms-triggers-and-tips/ Mon, 10 Oct 2022 15:50:00 +0000 https://deservedhealth.com/wheat-allergy-symptoms-triggers-and-tips/ Wheat allergies can cause a number of different symptoms. According to Cleveland Clinicsymptoms may appear minutes to hours after eating or inhaling wheat, but may take up to two days to appear. Symptoms that occur shortly after eating or inhaling wheat may include swelling or itching of the mouth or throat, hives, itchy rash, headache, […]]]>

Wheat allergies can cause a number of different symptoms. According to Cleveland Clinicsymptoms may appear minutes to hours after eating or inhaling wheat, but may take up to two days to appear.

Symptoms that occur shortly after eating or inhaling wheat may include swelling or itching of the mouth or throat, hives, itchy rash, headache, breathing problems, nasal congestion, diarrhea, cramps, nausea or vomiting (via Mayo Clinic). Some people can also suffer from anaphylaxis. This reaction has its own set of symptoms that indicate a life-threatening situation. These symptoms include tightness in the throat, chest pain, difficulty breathing, difficulty swallowing, dizziness, fainting, and pale or blue skin. Anaphylaxis can occur shortly after exposure to wheat. In some people, this can only happen if they exercise a few hours after eating wheat. The Mayo Clinic calls this wheat-dependent, exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

According to ACAAI, certain wheat allergy symptoms like stomach cramps, diarrhea, and gastrointestinal discomfort are also signs of celiac disease. It is therefore important to make the correct diagnosis.

]]>
Symptoms, treatments, foods to avoid https://deservedhealth.com/symptoms-treatments-foods-to-avoid/ Mon, 10 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://deservedhealth.com/symptoms-treatments-foods-to-avoid/ Although rare, a person can develop an allergic reaction after ingesting or using coconut or coconut products. Symptoms can range from mild to severe, including skin rashes, vomiting, and rapid heart rate. Coconut is a nutrient dense food, high in fibre, calories and minerals, including zinc, iron, manganese, selenium, potassium and copper. Generally, people use […]]]>

Although rare, a person can develop an allergic reaction after ingesting or using coconut or coconut products. Symptoms can range from mild to severe, including skin rashes, vomiting, and rapid heart rate.

Coconut is a nutrient dense food, high in fibre, calories and minerals, including zinc, iron, manganese, selenium, potassium and copper.

Generally, people use coconut flesh, oil and liquid for cooking and frying. Some soaps, cosmetics and skin care products also contain coconut.

A person may experience unpleasant symptoms after taking coconut orally or topically. While the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) classifies the coconut as a nut for labeling purposes, it is a fruit of the coconut palm.

Many people with tree nut allergies can tolerate coconut well. However, a person with a nut allergy should discuss this with a doctor before taking coconut.

This article reviews the symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of coconut allergies.

A person may have a coconut allergy if they experience an allergic reaction soon after consuming coconut or using coconut products.

When a person has a coconut allergy, as with other food allergies, the immune system – the body’s main defense against infection – misinterprets the harmless proteins in coconut as a threat. .

In response to the threat, the body’s immune system attacks the allergen by producing specific IgE antibodies that bind to the coconut proteins. This binding can trigger immune defenses, causing reactive symptoms.

According to a study 2021coconut allergy is rare, but it is the most common food allergen in commercially available skin care products, with 75% of shampoos and body soaps containing coconut of coconut.

The authors also note that coconut is a typical natural moisturizer for babies, especially children with atopic dermatitis at high risk for food allergy.

This is a growing concern among parents and caregivers of children with food allergies. This may be due to the labeling of packaged foods required by the FDA and the growing demand for an alternative nutritional drink for children with cow’s milk allergy.

Research from 2017 identified the following coconut allergens:

  • Coc n2, a 7S globulin
  • Coc n4, an 11S globulin

Symptoms of coconut allergy can range from mild to severe and can include the following:

The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (AAAAI) notes that a person may experience any of these symptoms after coming into contact with a small amount of coconut.

If anyone has worsening symptoms, including anaphylaxis, they should contact their doctor immediately or go to the nearest hospital. Without prompt treatment, anaphylaxis can be fatal.

Allergic contact dermatitis can occur after applying a coconut-derived product to the skin. Symptoms may include itchy blisters or rashes 24 to 96 hours after exposure. A person can initially tolerate a contact allergen. However, with repeated exposures over time – especially in people with other allergic conditions such as eczema – contact dermatitis to a previously tolerated allergen may develop.

Although a person may not notice any changes in their skin immediately after using products containing coconut, a discolored, itchy rash develops on their hands the next day. It may take several days for coconut-induced contact dermatitis to resolve on its own.

People who use coconut topically may have a higher risk of coconut-induced contact dermatitis. Due to the high presence of coconut in different skin and hair care products, experts recommend that a person speak with a doctor before applying coconut products topically.

Foods belonging to the same biological class or family generally have similar proteins. If a person is allergic to a protein in a particular food, they can most likely react when eating other foods containing a similar protein.

According to the charity Anaphylaxis United Kingdom, coconut is a member of the palm family and is not closely related to tree nuts. Examples of nuts include almonds, walnuts, hazelnuts, Brazil nuts, cashews and pistachios.

This indicates that people with tree nut allergies can tolerate coconut well. A person with a coconut allergy can also safely consume nuts.

However, on rare occasions, a person may experience cross-reactivity with coconut and other fruits containing similar protein content.

To research indicates that two people with tree nut allergies reacted to coconuts due to a cross-reacting protein. Another person with a coconut allergy developed oral allergy symptoms after consuming coconuts. The authors identified a cross-reacting protein found in coconut and hazelnut as the cause.

Evidence from this report suggests that there is cross-reactivity between coconut and walnut and between coconut and hazelnut.

If a person has concerns about developing cross-reactivity, they should talk to a doctor.

The AAAAI notes that a proper diagnosis is the first step in disease management. To diagnose a coconut allergy, the doctor can recommend subsequent exams. This includes:

  • Medical background: The doctor will take a person’s medical history to understand the symptoms and causes of a person’s coconut allergy.
  • Physical examination: The doctor may perform a physical examination of a person’s eyes, ears, nose, throat, chest, and skin. They may also order a lung function test or X-ray to examine how a person is breathing.

A doctor can perform a skin test, patch, or blood test to accurately diagnose a person’s coconut allergy symptoms.

  • Skin test: The doctor will place a small droplet of allergen on the skin and gently prick the skin with a needle or sharp plastic device through the droplet of allergen. A person with an immediate type coconut allergy will experience discoloration, itching and swelling at the sting site within 15 minutes.
  • Patch test: This test can help the doctor determine which specific coconut allergen is causing contact dermatitis. The doctor will place a small amount of allergen on a person’s skin, cover it with a bandage, and examine any skin reactions within 48 to 96 hours. A person will have a local rash if they are allergic.
  • Blood test: If a person does not tolerate skin testing, the doctor may take their blood sample and measure the number of antibodies to coconut allergens in their blood.

According to American Asthma and Allergy Foundation (AAFA)If a person is diagnosed with an immediate type IgE-mediated coconut allergy, the doctor will recommend avoiding the use and taking of coconut or coconut-based products. It’s the best treatment plan.

There is currently no cure for coconut allergy. There are also no medications to prevent reactions.

However, a doctor may recommend antihistamines to help reduce any worsening of symptoms.

They can also recommend certain habits to adopt, including:

  • read food labels to avoid eating foods containing coconut
  • asking about ingredients when eating food prepared by families, friends, or restaurants
  • complete an anaphylaxis action plan and carry self-injectable epinephrine such as the EpiPen with you at all times

Some people may find that changing their diet improves their coconut allergy symptoms. This may involve avoiding foods containing coconut, such as:

  • coconut
  • coconut aminos
  • coconut cream
  • coconut extract
  • coconut flour
  • coconut milk
  • coconut milk powder
  • coconut sugar
  • coconut oil
  • coconut water
  • coconut powder
  • grated coconut
  • grated coconut

People with coconut allergies should be vigilant about reading labels to ensure that nothing they eat contains coconut or could have been contaminated with coconut during production .

Coconut allergy is rare. Symptoms can vary from mild to severe.

Avoiding foods and products containing coconut is the best way to prevent allergic reactions.

However, since coconut is a staple in many diets and products, people should be careful to avoid accidental exposure.

]]>
Symptoms, treatments, foods to avoid https://deservedhealth.com/symptoms-treatments-foods-to-avoid-2/ Mon, 10 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://deservedhealth.com/symptoms-treatments-foods-to-avoid-2/ Although rare, a person can develop an allergic reaction after ingesting or using coconut or coconut products. Symptoms can range from mild to severe, including skin rashes, vomiting, and rapid heart rate. Coconut is a nutrient dense food, high in fibre, calories and minerals, including zinc, iron, manganese, selenium, potassium and copper. Generally, people use […]]]>

Although rare, a person can develop an allergic reaction after ingesting or using coconut or coconut products. Symptoms can range from mild to severe, including skin rashes, vomiting, and rapid heart rate.

Coconut is a nutrient dense food, high in fibre, calories and minerals, including zinc, iron, manganese, selenium, potassium and copper.

Generally, people use coconut flesh, oil and liquid for cooking and frying. Some soaps, cosmetics and skin care products also contain coconut.

A person may experience unpleasant symptoms after taking coconut orally or topically. While the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) classifies the coconut as a nut for labeling purposes, it is a fruit of the coconut palm.

Many people with tree nut allergies can tolerate coconut well. However, a person with a nut allergy should discuss this with a doctor before taking coconut.

This article reviews the symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of coconut allergies.

A person may have a coconut allergy if they experience an allergic reaction soon after consuming coconut or using coconut products.

When a person has a coconut allergy, as with other food allergies, the immune system – the body’s main defense against infection – misinterprets the harmless proteins in coconut as a threat. .

In response to the threat, the body’s immune system attacks the allergen by producing specific IgE antibodies that bind to the coconut proteins. This binding can trigger immune defenses, causing reactive symptoms.

According to a study 2021coconut allergy is rare, but it is the most common food allergen in commercially available skin care products, with 75% of shampoos and body soaps containing coconut of coconut.

The authors also note that coconut is a typical natural moisturizer for babies, especially children with atopic dermatitis at high risk for food allergy.

This is a growing concern among parents and caregivers of children with food allergies. This may be due to the labeling of packaged foods required by the FDA and the growing demand for an alternative nutritional drink for children with cow’s milk allergy.

Research from 2017 identified the following coconut allergens:

  • Coc n2, a 7S globulin
  • Coc n4, an 11S globulin

Symptoms of coconut allergy can range from mild to severe and can include the following:

The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology (AAAAI) notes that a person may experience any of these symptoms after coming into contact with a small amount of coconut.

If anyone has worsening symptoms, including anaphylaxis, they should contact their doctor immediately or go to the nearest hospital. Without prompt treatment, anaphylaxis can be fatal.

Allergic contact dermatitis can occur after applying a coconut-derived product to the skin. Symptoms may include itchy blisters or rashes 24 to 96 hours after exposure. A person can initially tolerate a contact allergen. However, with repeated exposures over time – especially in people with other allergic conditions such as eczema – contact dermatitis to a previously tolerated allergen may develop.

Although a person may not notice any changes in their skin immediately after using products containing coconut, a discolored, itchy rash develops on their hands the next day. It may take several days for coconut-induced contact dermatitis to resolve on its own.

People who use coconut topically may have a higher risk of coconut-induced contact dermatitis. Due to the high presence of coconut in different skin and hair care products, experts recommend that a person speak with a doctor before applying coconut products topically.

Foods belonging to the same biological class or family generally have similar proteins. If a person is allergic to a protein in a particular food, they can most likely react when eating other foods containing a similar protein.

According to the charity Anaphylaxis United Kingdom, coconut is a member of the palm family and is not closely related to tree nuts. Examples of nuts include almonds, walnuts, hazelnuts, Brazil nuts, cashews and pistachios.

This indicates that people with tree nut allergies can tolerate coconut well. A person with a coconut allergy can also safely consume nuts.

However, on rare occasions, a person may experience cross-reactivity with coconut and other fruits containing similar protein content.

To research indicates that two people with tree nut allergies reacted to coconuts due to a cross-reacting protein. Another person with a coconut allergy developed oral allergy symptoms after consuming coconuts. The authors identified a cross-reacting protein found in coconut and hazelnut as the cause.

Evidence from this report suggests that there is cross-reactivity between coconut and walnut and between coconut and hazelnut.

If a person has concerns about developing cross-reactivity, they should talk to a doctor.

The AAAAI notes that a proper diagnosis is the first step in disease management. To diagnose a coconut allergy, the doctor can recommend subsequent examinations. This includes:

  • Medical background: The doctor will take a person’s medical history to understand the symptoms and causes of a person’s coconut allergy.
  • Physical examination: The doctor may perform a physical examination of a person’s eyes, ears, nose, throat, chest, and skin. They may also order a lung function test or X-ray to examine how a person is breathing.

A doctor can perform a skin test, patch, or blood test to accurately diagnose a person’s coconut allergy symptoms.

  • Skin test: The doctor will place a small droplet of allergen on the skin and gently prick the skin with a needle or sharp plastic device through the droplet of allergen. A person with an immediate type coconut allergy will experience discoloration, itching and swelling at the sting site within 15 minutes.
  • Patch test: This test can help the doctor determine which specific coconut allergen is causing contact dermatitis. The doctor will place a small amount of allergen on a person’s skin, cover it with a bandage, and examine any skin reactions within 48 to 96 hours. A person will have a local rash if they are allergic.
  • Blood test: If a person does not tolerate skin testing, the doctor may take their blood sample and measure the number of antibodies to coconut allergens in their blood.

According to American Asthma and Allergy Foundation (AAFA)If a person is diagnosed with an immediate type IgE-mediated coconut allergy, the doctor will recommend avoiding the use and taking of coconut or coconut-based products. It’s the best treatment plan.

There is currently no cure for coconut allergy. There are also no medications to prevent reactions.

However, a doctor may recommend antihistamines to help reduce any worsening of symptoms.

They can also recommend certain habits to adopt, including:

  • read food labels to avoid eating foods containing coconut
  • asking about ingredients when eating food prepared by families, friends, or restaurants
  • complete an anaphylaxis action plan and carry self-injectable epinephrine such as the EpiPen with you at all times

Some people may find that changing their diet improves their coconut allergy symptoms. This may involve avoiding foods containing coconut, such as:

  • coconut
  • coconut aminos
  • coconut cream
  • coconut extract
  • coconut flour
  • coconut milk
  • coconut milk powder
  • coconut sugar
  • coconut oil
  • coconut water
  • coconut powder
  • grated coconut
  • grated coconut

People with coconut allergies should be vigilant about reading labels to ensure that nothing they eat contains coconut or could have been contaminated with coconut during production .

Coconut allergy is rare. Symptoms can vary from mild to severe.

Avoiding foods and products containing coconut is the best way to prevent allergic reactions.

However, since coconut is a staple in many diets and products, people should be careful to avoid accidental exposure.

]]>
How to know if you have a gluten allergy https://deservedhealth.com/how-to-know-if-you-have-a-gluten-allergy/ Sun, 02 Oct 2022 22:05:28 +0000 https://deservedhealth.com/how-to-know-if-you-have-a-gluten-allergy/ It is estimated that only 6% of the American population suffers from a gluten allergy or intolerance. While it’s still unclear if the allergy affects Black Americans more than other ethnicities, it’s still important for you to know what a gluten allergy can look like. If the problem is not properly managed, it can have […]]]>

It is estimated that only 6% of the American population suffers from a gluten allergy or intolerance. While it’s still unclear if the allergy affects Black Americans more than other ethnicities, it’s still important for you to know what a gluten allergy can look like. If the problem is not properly managed, it can have a negative impact on your daily life.

What is a gluten allergy?

Gluten is a protein commonly found in grains such as wheat, barley and rye. When you have a gluten allergy, your body reacts negatively to the presence of the protein. This reaction will make you sick.

Remember that a gluten allergy is not the same as celiac disease, as the latter condition is an autoimmune disease. An allergy is also different from an intolerance. Your immune system’s overreaction causes gluten to be present in the former, while the latter means your body cannot digest it.

RELATED: Is Gluten Making You Sick? Look for these superior signs!

How to know if you have a gluten allergy

If you experience digestive discomfort and other symptoms after eating gluten, you may have a gluten allergy. Since gluten is found in many common foods as well as medications, you may not always know you’ve eaten it. The best thing to do is to keep track of what you eat and how it affects you.

What does a gluten allergy look like?

A gluten allergy can be different for each person. With an allergy, you are likely to get itchy after eating gluten.

You might also have an upset stomach. If you suffer from gluten intolerance, however, the issues tend to center more on the digestive system, leading to issues like bloating and stomach pain.

RELATED: 9 signs you might be allergic to gluten

Gluten Allergy Symptoms You Need to Know About

You are unlikely to experience all the symptoms of an allergy or intolerance, but there are a few that are common.

It is also important to note that an allergy can show up within an hour of consuming gluten.

However, it can take up to a few days before symptoms of gluten intolerance show up.

Common symptoms of gluten allergy:

]]>
How to know if you have a gluten allergy https://deservedhealth.com/how-to-know-if-you-have-a-gluten-allergy-2/ Sun, 02 Oct 2022 22:05:28 +0000 https://deservedhealth.com/how-to-know-if-you-have-a-gluten-allergy-2/ It is estimated that only 6% of the American population suffers from a gluten allergy or intolerance. While it’s still unclear if the allergy affects Black Americans more than other ethnicities, it’s still important for you to know what a gluten allergy can look like. If the problem is not properly managed, it can have […]]]>

It is estimated that only 6% of the American population suffers from a gluten allergy or intolerance. While it’s still unclear if the allergy affects Black Americans more than other ethnicities, it’s still important for you to know what a gluten allergy can look like. If the problem is not properly managed, it can have a negative impact on your daily life.

What is a gluten allergy?

Gluten is a protein commonly found in grains such as wheat, barley and rye. When you have a gluten allergy, your body reacts negatively to the presence of the protein. This reaction will make you sick.

Remember that a gluten allergy is not the same as celiac disease, as the latter condition is an autoimmune disease. An allergy is also different from an intolerance. Your immune system’s overreaction causes gluten to be present in the former, while the latter means your body cannot digest it.

RELATED: Does gluten make you sick? Look for these superior signs!

How to know if you have a gluten allergy

If you experience digestive discomfort and other symptoms after eating gluten, you may have a gluten allergy. Since gluten is found in many common foods as well as medications, you may not always know you’ve eaten it. The best thing to do is to keep track of what you eat and how it affects you.

What does a gluten allergy look like?

A gluten allergy can be different for each person. With an allergy, you are likely to get itchy after eating gluten.

You might also have an upset stomach. If you suffer from gluten intolerance, however, the issues tend to center more on the digestive system, leading to issues like bloating and stomach pain.

RELATED: 9 signs you might be allergic to gluten

Gluten Allergy Symptoms You Need to Know About

You are unlikely to experience all the symptoms of an allergy or intolerance, but there are a few that are common.

It is also important to note that an allergy can show up within an hour of consuming gluten.

However, it can take up to a few days before symptoms of gluten intolerance show up.

Common symptoms of gluten allergy:

]]>