Allergy symptoms – Deserved Health http://deservedhealth.com/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 18:58:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://deservedhealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.png Allergy symptoms – Deserved Health http://deservedhealth.com/ 32 32 Targeted micronutrition helps alleviate allergy symptoms https://deservedhealth.com/targeted-micronutrition-helps-alleviate-allergy-symptoms/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 18:58:47 +0000 https://deservedhealth.com/targeted-micronutrition-helps-alleviate-allergy-symptoms/ Micronutrient deficiencies can promote inflammation and make the immune system particularly sensitive to allergenic substances. In particular, iron deficiency signals danger to immune cells and results in a more pronounced and exaggerated immune response. For the first time, scientists from the Messerli Research Institute of MedUni Vienna, Vetmeduni Vienna and the University of Vienna conducted […]]]>

Micronutrient deficiencies can promote inflammation and make the immune system particularly sensitive to allergenic substances. In particular, iron deficiency signals danger to immune cells and results in a more pronounced and exaggerated immune response. For the first time, scientists from the Messerli Research Institute of MedUni Vienna, Vetmeduni Vienna and the University of Vienna conducted a placebo-controlled trial and showed that targeted dietary measures can reduce symptom burden in allergic reactions. Researchers are therefore opening up a whole new avenue in the care of people with allergies. The study has just been published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice.

The background of the studies carried out by the researchers of the Messerli Interuniversity Research Institute in collaboration with the University Department of Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases of MedUni Vienna is the vicious circle of allergy: an immune system overactive puts the body on alert and inhibits adequate absorption of iron — even though it is precisely the micronutrient needed to moderate the overreaction. To compensate for the micronutrient deficiencies of the immune cells, the scientific team developed a lozenge which was tested for the first time in a double-blind against placebo within the framework of the study.

Bypass of iron absorption inhibition

The lozenge is based on cow beta-lactoglobulin whey protein, which acts as a carrier for many micronutrients. “Thanks to this transporter, absorption takes place via the lymph instead of the blood vessels – in other words, exactly where immune cells are present in abundance, ensuring targeted absorption of micronutrients”, explains the head of the study. Franziska Roth-Walter study from the Messerli Research Institute. Since a tablet contains only a very small amount of iron, less than one milligram, it is not considered an iron supplement. Instead, the micronutrients are in a suitable form to be transported by whey protein beta-lactoglobulin and therefore to immune cells. According to the study results, supplementation with this lozenge significantly reduced the burden of symptoms in people allergic to birch and grass pollen. In addition, after six months of intake, there was an identifiable improvement in iron status of circulating monocytes and red blood cell parameters. Supplementation with the lozenge resulted in a 45% reduction in the Combined Medication Symptom Score, a measure of symptoms and medication use, during the peak birch pollen season.

Reduce immune cell hypersensitivity

To date, specific allergen immunotherapy is considered the only causative treatment option for alleviating allergic diseases. This involves using an allergen specifically against the allergy in question, for example birch pollen against birch pollen allergy. “The supply of immune cells with micronutrients via the lozenge showed surprisingly similar efficacy, but in a completely allergen-independent and therefore universal way”, specifies Franziska Roth-Walter. The study therefore presents a new approach to the care of people with allergies. In this approach, a dietary measure is used to reduce the underlying hypersensitivity of immune cells to allergenic substances rather than targeting the allergy itself.

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Symptoms, what to avoid and more https://deservedhealth.com/symptoms-what-to-avoid-and-more-5/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 18:10:56 +0000 https://deservedhealth.com/symptoms-what-to-avoid-and-more-5/ A banana allergy is an allergic reaction to a protein found in bananas. This type of reaction usually occurs with allergies to other foods or with a latex allergy. Bananas are often one of the first solids given to babies and are generally very well tolerated at this age. It is thought that a banana […]]]>

A banana allergy is an allergic reaction to a protein found in bananas. This type of reaction usually occurs with allergies to other foods or with a latex allergy.

Bananas are often one of the first solids given to babies and are generally very well tolerated at this age. It is thought that a banana allergy is rare and people with a banana allergy develop it later in life.

Learn about banana allergy incidence, risk factors, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment options, and management strategies.

pkstock/Getty Images


Incidence of banana allergy

Studies suggest that the prevalence of banana allergy is less than 1% of the general population.

In infants

Food allergies are more common in children and infants than in adults.

Research suggests that the prevalence of food allergies in children under 3 years old is between 5% and 8%.

Although banana allergy in infants is rare, some cases have been reported in infants.

Risk factors

An allergic reaction to food begins in the immune system. But the exact cause of food allergy is unknown.

Researchers have identified certain factors that put a person at higher risk of developing a food allergy.

family history

If a person has an immediate family member with an allergic condition such as a food allergy, eczema, or asthma, they are at a slightly higher risk of developing an allergy to a particular food themselves.

However, individual food allergies can differ between family members.

Other terms

People with other allergic conditions are more likely to develop food allergies.

For example, people who had eczema (a condition that causes red, itchy skin) as children have an increased risk of developing a food allergy.

Link to Latex Allergy

People with a latex allergy or latex food syndrome may also be allergic to bananas. This is because the proteins in latex and bananas are similar.

Latex is a natural product that comes from the rubber tree. Latex is used in products like gloves and balloons.

About 30-50% of people with a latex allergy may also have a fruit allergy. The most common are banana, chestnut, avocado and kiwi.

Banana Allergy Symptoms

Banana allergy symptoms can occur seconds or minutes after eating the banana.

Symptoms of a banana allergy can vary from person to person and can include:

  • Urticaria
  • Itchy skin which may include a rash
  • Itching in the mouth and throat
  • Swollen lips and tongue
  • swelling of the skin
  • Difficulties swallowing
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Abdominal pain
  • Itchy eyes
  • To sneeze

Complications

In some rare cases, a banana allergy can cause serious symptoms like:

  • Throat narrowing
  • Wheezing
  • breathing problems
  • Drop in blood pressure
  • Collapse
  • Loss of consciousness
  • Anaphylaxis

Symptoms of Anaphylaxis

Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening medical emergency and being able to recognize the symptoms could save a life.
A person experiencing anaphylaxis can experience a variety of symptoms. These may include:

  • A hoarse voice
  • Tightness in the chest
  • Difficulty breathing
  • To cough
  • Wheezing
  • Swollen throat and difficulty swallowing
  • stomach cramps
  • Often itchy red rash
  • Hives or welts
  • Pale skin
  • Redness in the face or body
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Loss of consciousness
  • A sense of impending doom

Symptoms usually appear within five to 30 minutes of contact with an allergen, but in some cases symptoms can take up to an hour or two to develop.

If you or someone close to you has anaphylaxis, help them use their EpiPen (epinephrine injection) immediately if they have one prescribed and call 911.

Diagnostic

Allergies are usually diagnosed by an allergist or immunologist. Diagnosing an allergy requires a careful history. A health care provider will begin by taking a complete medical history, as well as a physical exam.

If the medical history suggests an IgE (immunoglobulin E)-mediated food allergy, a blood or skin test will likely be ordered for the suspected food(s).

During skin testing, small amounts of extracted food are punctured under the skin of the arm or back. These bites are compared to positive and negative controls to assess allergy and ensure the validity of the test.

For blood tests, patients will have their blood drawn and have their results reviewed with them at a later date.

A blood or skin test can be used to diagnose a food allergy.

If the history is not suggestive of a food allergy or if the blood or skin test result is low enough, an allergist-immunologist may recommend a medically supervised provocation to better establish or rule out the diagnosis of food allergy.

Treatment

There is no cure for food allergies, however, management strategies can make living with allergies a little easier.

People with food allergies should do everything possible to avoid their allergens. This involves paying attention to reading food labels and asking questions about restaurant meals.

It is important to always have an EpiPen on hand to prepare in case of an anaphylactic reaction.

Things to avoid

People with a banana allergy should avoid eating bananas and foods that contain them.

Fruit drinks and fruit salads may contain bananas and should be consumed with caution.

People with a banana allergy should always read food labels and be aware that bananas can also be used as a flavoring in medications.

It can also be present in shampoo or body lotion.

Food alternatives

During a banana allergy test, it’s likely that an allergist will be able to identify other foods that may be causing a reaction in you.

People with an existing food allergy may also be allergic to other foods, so it’s important to ask your healthcare provider if this applies to you.

People with a banana allergy may also be allergic to:

  • chestnut
  • Kiwi
  • Lawyer
  • The Peach
  • olive
  • Tomato
  • Carrot
  • pepper
  • Plantain

If you are only allergic to bananas, you can freely eat other foods. Always be sure to check the label in case the banana is an unexpected ingredient.

When to See a Health Care Provider

If you think you may be allergic to bananas, contact your healthcare professional. They will be able to organize tests.

You should call a health care provider immediately if you or your child have eaten food and experience any of the following symptoms:

  • Covered in hives
  • Big facial swelling
  • Vomiting
  • stomach cramps
  • sick look

Call 911 immediately if you or someone near you has symptoms of anaphylaxis.

Summary

A banana allergy is rare and affects less than 1% of the population. Risk factors for a banana allergy include a family history of allergy or previous allergic conditions.

Symptoms of a banana allergy can vary widely and can include swelling, itching and, in severe cases, breathing problems.

An allergist will likely use either a skin or blood allergy test or a medically supervised food challenge to diagnose or rule out a banana allergy. There is no cure for a banana allergy, but avoiding bananas, reading food labels, and carrying an EpiPen are essential management strategies.

A word from Verywell

Dealing with allergies can be distressing. But a banana allergy is very unlikely. If you think you or your child has a banana allergy, consider making an appointment with a healthcare professional.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • How common is a banana allergy?

    A banana allergy is considered rare. Research suggests that less than 1% of the population is allergic to bananas.

  • Can you suddenly develop a banana allergy or were you born with it?

    Food allergies usually first appear in children and infants. However, an allergy can occur at any time of life, including adulthood.

    Allergies can be hereditary, which means they can be passed down through a family’s genes.

  • What is the most common fruit allergy?

    It is possible to be allergic to any form of fruit, however, some fruits are more likely to be allergens than others. Commonly reported fruit allergens include:

    • Pear
    • The Peach
    • Orange
    • Cherry
    • Apple
    • Banana
    • Apricot
    • Melon

  • Is a banana allergy the same as a latex allergy?

    Some people with a latex allergy may also be allergic to bananas and vice versa. Indeed, there is a similarity between the proteins found in latex and bananas.

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COLUMN: Can nutritional choices help relieve allergy symptoms? https://deservedhealth.com/column-can-nutritional-choices-help-relieve-allergy-symptoms/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 17:30:00 +0000 https://deservedhealth.com/column-can-nutritional-choices-help-relieve-allergy-symptoms/ Madison Brown, Registered Dietitian at Bradford Zehrs shares some tips for those who suffer from seasonal allergies Allergy season is upon us in Bradford, making it a stressful time for many in the community trying to control their symptoms. A little-known fact is that people with persistent emotional stress have more frequent allergy flare-ups. According […]]]>

Madison Brown, Registered Dietitian at Bradford Zehrs shares some tips for those who suffer from seasonal allergies

Allergy season is upon us in Bradford, making it a stressful time for many in the community trying to control their symptoms.

A little-known fact is that people with persistent emotional stress have more frequent allergy flare-ups. According to research, stress hormones can speed up the immune system’s already exaggerated response, so people with persistent emotional stress can have more severe allergy flare-ups. The good news is that nutrition, in addition to over-the-counter allergy medications, can help manage your symptoms.

Although there is no cure for seasonal allergies, certain lifestyle changes, such as a change in diet, can help relieve your symptoms and boost your immune system’s ability to fight allergies. Plus, the vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients are great for your overall health!

Here’s where to start:

Probiotics – Probiotics can help maintain gut health and improve your overall quality of life. Live microorganisms play an important role in the digestive system, helping balance your good bacteria and producing a stronger immune response to common allergens. Examples of foods rich in probiotics are kefir, sauerkraut, kimchi or yogurt.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids – Omega 3s are nutrients you get from eating certain types of foods or taking supplements, helping to boost your immune system and maintain your overall health. Fatty fish like salmon and sardines are rich in omega-3s. A diet high in omega-3s can reduce inflammation and may help relieve nasal congestion and swelling.

Spices – When you consume spices, the effects on the body are clear. Some people start sweating, while others have a tickle in their throat. Spices like ginger and turmeric relieve allergies by stimulating mucous cilia to help decongest. Ginger, in its many forms (fresh, dried, and powdered), can help relieve some of the most common unpleasant inflammatory allergy symptoms, such as swelling and irritation of the throat, eyes, and nasal passages. . Turmeric is an anti-inflammatory spice that contains curcumin, which has been linked to reduced symptoms of many inflammatory conditions.

For those with seasonal allergies, remember that everyone’s body is different, so these dietary changes may work for some, but not all. There are many ways to combat seasonal allergies, you just have to find the right one!

Over-the-counter medications are the option of choice for many allergy sufferers. A pharmacist can guide you through the different types and recommend the best one based on your symptoms.

As your local Zehrs Bradford Dietitian, I am also here to support you and help you improve your overall well-being through personalized nutrition services. To discuss your unique needs, schedule an appointment with me at Zehrs.ca/dietitians.

Madison Brown, Dietitian, MHSc, MSc, Zehrs Bradford

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Three simple additions to your diet to help reduce seasonal allergy symptoms – Stittsville Central https://deservedhealth.com/three-simple-additions-to-your-diet-to-help-reduce-seasonal-allergy-symptoms-stittsville-central/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 03:31:06 +0000 https://deservedhealth.com/three-simple-additions-to-your-diet-to-help-reduce-seasonal-allergy-symptoms-stittsville-central/ (Alexes Papadopoli is a registered dietitian at Brown’s Your Independent Grocer in Stittsville and at Loblaws Kanata.) To say the past two years have been stressful is an understatement. More and more Canadians are feeling higher levels of stress, especially since the pandemic, and according to research, stress can impact allergy symptoms. Stress hormones can […]]]>

(Alexes Papadopoli is a registered dietitian at Brown’s Your Independent Grocer in Stittsville and at Loblaws Kanata.)

To say the past two years have been stressful is an understatement. More and more Canadians are feeling higher levels of stress, especially since the pandemic, and according to research, stress can impact allergy symptoms. Stress hormones can increase an already exaggerated immune system response, so people with persistent emotional stress can experience more severe allergy flare-ups.1 With warmer weather approaching in Stittsville, it’s important to find the best ways to manage our allergy symptoms this season. The good news is that nutrition, in addition to over-the-counter allergy medications, can help manage your symptoms.

Although we can’t get rid of our allergies through food, we can help our immune system fight allergy symptoms. By maintaining an optimal anti-inflammatory diet that includes lots of the nutrients you need, you can help your immune system fight off allergies. Plus, the vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients are great for your overall health.

Omega-3 fatty acids – diets rich in omega-3s can help boost your immune system and maintain your overall health. Fatty fish like salmon and sardines are rich in omega-3s. A diet high in omega-3s can reduce inflammation and may help relieve nasal congestion and swelling.

Spices – Spices, such as ginger and turmeric, can relieve persistent and unpleasant inflammatory allergy symptoms. Ginger, whether fresh, dried, or powdered, can help clear any swelling or irritation in the eyes, nose, and throat naturally. Turmeric is known to reduce inflammation, which can improve the severity of allergy symptoms. Its active ingredient, curcumin, has been linked to reduced symptoms of many inflammatory conditions. If you feel congested, consider adding spices or teas to your diet.

Probiotics – New studies suggest probiotics may be beneficial in treating allergies, so adding these microorganisms to your diet can be invaluable in your fight against allergy symptoms. Considered “good” bacteria, probiotics not only help maintain gut health, but live microorganisms also play an important role in regulating our immune system. They may also provide anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic effects. Examples of foods that may contain probiotics are kefir, sauerkraut, kimchi, or yogurt.

As a local dietitian at Brown’s Your Independent Grocer and Loblaws Kanata, Alexes is also there to support you and can help improve your overall well-being through personalized nutrition services. To discuss your unique needs, book your free 15-minute consultation with me or one of my colleagues from the Ottawa Dietetics team at DietitianServices.ca.

———————
1Dr Ahmad Sedaghata Harvard-affiliated ear, nose and throat specialist,
https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/is-stress-making-your-allergy-symptoms-worse. ———————

Red Bean Tofu Curry with Brown Basmati Rice

Ingredients:

  • 1-1/2 cups (375 mL) PC® Brown Basmati Rice
  • 1 C. (15ml) olive oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 jalapeño pepper, seeded and finely chopped
  • 2 tbsp. (25 mL) chopped fresh peeled ginger
  • 1 C. 1/2 tsp (5 mL) each ground coriander and ground cumin
  • 1/2 tsp. (2 ml) ground turmeric
  • 1/4 tsp. 1/2 tsp (1 mL) cayenne pepper
  • 1 can (796 mL) PC® Blue Menu® Whole Tomatoes
  • 1 pkg. (500 g) PC® Blue Menu® Kidney Beans – Frozen
  • 1 pkg. (350 g) PC® Blue Menu® Extra Firm Tofu
  • 1/4 cup (50 mL) chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1 C. (15 ml) Fresh lemon juice
  • 1 C. (5 ml) Salt

Instructions:

  1. Combine rice and 2-1/2 cups of water in a large saucepan. Bring to a boil. Stir, cover and reduce the heat
    to lower. Simmer until all the water is absorbed, about 25 minutes. Remove from fire. let stand 5
    minutes. Fluff with a fork.
  2. Meanwhile, heat the oil in a separate large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion; cook while stirring
    occasionally, until softened, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic, jalapeño, ginger, cilantro, cumin,
    turmeric and cayenne pepper; cook, stirring often, until fragrant, about 3 minutes.
  3. Add tomatoes; bring to a boil. Stir in frozen beans and tofu; return to simmer. To cook,
    stirring occasionally, until beans are tender and liquid has thickened slightly, 15 to 20 minutes.
  4. Remove from fire; stir in cilantro, lemon juice and salt. Serve over rice.

SUPPORT THE LOCAL STITTSVILLE


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Iron supplement lozenges reduce birch and grass pollen allergy symptoms https://deservedhealth.com/iron-supplement-lozenges-reduce-birch-and-grass-pollen-allergy-symptoms/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 18:56:10 +0000 https://deservedhealth.com/iron-supplement-lozenges-reduce-birch-and-grass-pollen-allergy-symptoms/ Source/Disclosures Disclosures: Roth-Walter reports co-inventor of EP2894478 and EP14150965.3, January 2014, U.S. Patent 14/204,570, underlying holoBLG wafer, owned by Biomedical International R+D GmbH, and receives fee lecturer from Allergy Therapeutics, Association for the Advancement of Human Allergy and Endoscopy Research (VAEM eV), Bencard Allergie GmbH and Forum for Medical Education. Please see the […]]]>


Disclosures: Roth-Walter reports co-inventor of EP2894478 and EP14150965.3, January 2014, U.S. Patent 14/204,570, underlying holoBLG wafer, owned by Biomedical International R+D GmbH, and receives fee lecturer from Allergy Therapeutics, Association for the Advancement of Human Allergy and Endoscopy Research (VAEM eV), Bencard Allergie GmbH and Forum for Medical Education. Please see the study for relevant financial information from all other authors.


We have not been able to process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this problem, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

According to a study published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice.

“We discovered almost 10 years ago that the majority of allergens can affect the iron status of allergic subjects and that iron deficiency alone is not only sufficient to facilitate allergic sensitization, but is also associated with inflammation. and an exaggerated immune response.” Franziska Roth-Walter, PhD, head of the working group at the Messerli Research Institute in Vienna, Healio told.


Data are from Bartosik T, et al. J Allergy Clin Immunol Practice. 2022; doi:10.1016/j.anai.2022.04.032.

Additionally, Roth-Walter said researchers know that not everyone is prone to allergies, but people with so-called atopy have an inherent tendency to produce IgE antibodies and be hypersensitive to allergens.

Franziska Roth-Walter

“We therefore set out to investigate whether treating functional iron deficiency, or iron deficiency that affects immune cells, could improve atopy,” Roth-Walter said.

The researchers chose beta-lactoglobulin, a whey protein, to transport micronutrients directly to immune cells to prevent atopic responses due to iron deficiency.

“For beta-lactoglobulin, dietary absorption would pass through the lymphatic system and therefore precisely through immune cells,” Roth-Walter said.

Study design, results

The randomized, double-blind study involved 47 premenopausal women (mean age 31) allergic to birch or grass pollen.

In the test arm (n=25), 68% were allergic to birch and 88% were allergic to grass pollen. In the placebo arm (n=22), 77% were allergic to birch and 81% were allergic to grass pollen.

The researchers took blood and stool samples from each participant and performed nasal provocations at the start and end of the study. Additionally, the researchers had the participants consume two lozenges daily for 6 months and record their daily symptoms and medication use in a pollen diary.

The holoBLG lozenge (Biomedical International R+D GmbH) included whey concentrate, less than 1mg iron, catechins, retinoic acid, zinc and sorbitol as carrier material, with mountain herbs for flavor. The placebo lozenges did not contain any active ingredient.

Total nasal symptom scores (TNSS) did not differ between the groups at the start of the study, but participants taking the holoBLG lozenge had significantly lower scores after 6 months compared to the placebo group. The placebo group’s TNSS scores fell from a mean of 4.37 to 3.82, an average individual improvement of 12.9%, while the holoBLG group’s scores fell from a mean of 4.78 to 2.58, an average individual improvement of 42.4% (P = .0005).

Additionally, the researchers found that both groups had significantly less runny nose after 6 months, but the holoBLG group had a significantly greater reduction in runny nose (reduced nasal symptom burden, 42% vs. 13 %; P = 0.04).

Symptom burden analyzes showed that the holoBLG group experienced statistically significant mean improvements over placebo of 45% in their Combined Symptom Treatment Score (CSMS), 39% in their Daily Symptom Score (dSS ) and 41% of their Symptom Treatment Score (SMS; all, P < 0.0001) during peak birch pollen season.

Throughout the grass pollen season, the holoBLG group experienced improvements of 40% in CSMS and 26% in dSS and SMS compared to the placebo group (all, P < .0001).

“While all of our preclinical data was very encouraging, we were still surprised by the degree of improvement in symptoms because the improvements were completely independent of allergens,” Roth-Walter said.

At baseline, both groups had comparable levels of allergen-specific IgE and total IgE. Allergen-specific IgE increased in both groups without statistically significant differences between them over the study period, but total IgE increased only in the placebo group.

The placebo group also had significantly higher C-reactive protein values ​​and a trend toward lower absolute lymphocyte counts compared to the holoBLG group at the end of the study period, the researchers said.

Additionally, the holoBLG group had significantly improved hematocrit levels and a reduced width of red blood cell distribution. Supplementation also appears to boost cellular components of the myeloid lineage, the researchers said.

“Although the lozenge only contained a very low amount of iron, we were indeed able to measure improvement in iron parameters in white blood cells, and even some red blood cell parameters improved slightly,” Roth said. – Walter.

The researchers found no significant difference in the relative numbers of monocyte CD14s+ cells before or supplementation in either group, but the holoBLG group showed increases in intracellular labile iron content in circulating CD14+ monocytes after the study.

Overall, the researchers found that the holoBLG pellet efficiently delivered its micronutrient cargo to monocytes but not to lymphocytes. The researchers also found the lozenges tolerable with no reported adverse effects. Only two participants disliked the taste, the researchers continued, and adherence was generally high.

The implications of the study

“The most important finding is that indeed, micronutrient deficiencies are important and should be addressed because they can worsen symptom burden,” Roth-Walter said.

“The fatigue of an atopic patient may not only be due to their disease, but also to an iron deficiency. In current practice, micronutrient dietary recommendations should be included,” she continued.

Although allergen immunotherapy is considered the only causative treatment option for improving atopic diseases, Roth-Walter said, delivering micronutrients to immune cells appears to have similar efficacy and may be another causative remedy for allergies.

“The lozenge calms the immune system more generally. As such, it may be particularly useful when the specific allergen is not known or when specific allergen immunotherapy is not feasible,” Roth-Walter said. “Since it’s mostly food, it could also be taken alongside specific allergen immunotherapy.”

The researchers plan to continue their studies.

“Currently, a clinical study with people with cat allergies is being completed, and another with people with pollen allergies is planned,” Roth-Walter said. “As animals also suffer from atopic diseases, we also plan to conduct a study in canine patients with atopic dermatitis.”

Reference:

For more information:

Franziska Roth-Walter, PhD, can be contacted at franziska.roth-walter@meduniwien.ac.at.

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A study offers a new approach in the care of people with allergies https://deservedhealth.com/a-study-offers-a-new-approach-in-the-care-of-people-with-allergies/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 18:40:01 +0000 https://deservedhealth.com/a-study-offers-a-new-approach-in-the-care-of-people-with-allergies/ Micronutrient deficiencies can promote inflammation and make the immune system particularly sensitive to allergenic substances. In particular, iron deficiency signals danger to immune cells and results in a more pronounced and exaggerated immune response. For the first time, scientists from the Messerli Research Institute of MedUni Vienna, Vetmeduni Vienna and the University of Vienna conducted […]]]>

Micronutrient deficiencies can promote inflammation and make the immune system particularly sensitive to allergenic substances. In particular, iron deficiency signals danger to immune cells and results in a more pronounced and exaggerated immune response. For the first time, scientists from the Messerli Research Institute of MedUni Vienna, Vetmeduni Vienna and the University of Vienna conducted a placebo-controlled trial and showed that targeted dietary measures can reduce symptom burden in allergic reactions. Researchers are therefore opening up a whole new avenue in the care of people with allergies. The study has just been published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice.

The background of the studies carried out by the researchers of the Messerli Interuniversity Research Institute in collaboration with the University Department of Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases of MedUni Vienna is the vicious circle of allergy: an immune system overactive puts the body on alert and inhibits adequate absorption of iron — even though it is precisely the micronutrient needed to moderate the overreaction. To compensate for the micronutrient deficiencies of the immune cells, the scientific team developed a lozenge which was tested for the first time in a double-blind fashion against a placebo within the framework of the study.

Bypass of iron absorption inhibition

The lozenge is based on cow beta-lactoglobulin whey protein, which acts as a carrier for many micronutrients. “Thanks to this transporter, absorption takes place via the lymph instead of the blood vessels – in other words, exactly where immune cells are present in abundance, ensuring targeted absorption of micronutrients”, explains the head of the study. Franziska Roth-Walter study from the Messerli Research Institute. Since a tablet contains only a very small amount of iron, less than one milligram, it is not considered an iron supplement. Instead, the micronutrients are in a suitable form to be transported by whey protein beta-lactoglobulin and therefore to immune cells. According to the study results, supplementation with this lozenge significantly reduced the burden of symptoms in people allergic to birch and grass pollen. In addition, after six months of intake, there was an identifiable improvement in iron status of circulating monocytes and red blood cell parameters. Supplementation with the lozenge resulted in a 45% reduction in the Combined Medication Symptom Score, a measure of symptoms and medication use, during the peak birch pollen season.

Reduce immune cell hypersensitivity

To date, specific allergen immunotherapy is considered the only causative treatment option for alleviating allergic diseases. This involves using an allergen specifically against the allergy in question, for example birch pollen against birch pollen allergy. “The supply of immune cells with micronutrients via the lozenge showed surprisingly similar efficacy, but in a completely allergen-independent and therefore universal way”, specifies Franziska Roth-Walter. The study therefore presents a new approach in the care of people with allergies. In this approach, a dietary measure is used to reduce the underlying hypersensitivity of immune cells to allergenic substances rather than targeting the allergy itself.

Source of the story:

Materials provided by Medical University of Vienna. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

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Targeted micronutrition improves allergy symptoms https://deservedhealth.com/targeted-micronutrition-improves-allergy-symptoms/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 13:21:14 +0000 https://deservedhealth.com/targeted-micronutrition-improves-allergy-symptoms/ 12/L). Credit : The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice (2022). DOI: 10.1016/j.jaip.2022.02.028″ width=”800″ height=”530″/> The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology combined the Symptom Medication Score (CSMS) and Daily Symptom Score (dSS) over (A) the peak, (B) the entire pollen season of the birch and (C) the entire grass pollen season, […]]]>

12/L). Credit : The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice (2022). DOI: 10.1016/j.jaip.2022.02.028″ width=”800″ height=”530″/>

The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology combined the Symptom Medication Score (CSMS) and Daily Symptom Score (dSS) over (A) the peak, (B) the entire pollen season of the birch and (C) the entire grass pollen season, 2019. A mixed-effects model using uncorrected Fisher’s least significant difference test with a single pooled variance was used for analysis during birch season. Normality in the groups was tested via the Anderson-Darling test. The placebo and β-lactoglobulin with flavonoid-iron, zinc, and retinoic acid complexes (holoBLG) arms were compared to the unpaired t-test for parametric data; nonparametric data were compared with the Mann-Whitney U test. ∗P12/L). Credit: The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice (2022). DOI: 10.1016/j.jaip.2022.02.028

Micronutrient deficiencies can promote inflammation and make the immune system particularly sensitive to allergenic substances. In particular, iron deficiency signals danger to immune cells and results in a more pronounced and exaggerated immune response. For the first time, scientists from the Messerli Research Institute of MedUni Vienna, Vetmeduni Vienna and the University of Vienna conducted a placebo-controlled trial and showed that targeted dietary measures can reduce symptom burden in allergic reactions. Researchers are therefore opening up a whole new avenue in the care of people with allergies. The study has just been published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice.

The background of the studies carried out by the researchers of the Messerli Interuniversity Research Institute in collaboration with the University Department of Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases of MedUni Vienna is the vicious circle of allergy: an immune system overactive puts the body on alert and inhibits adequate absorption of iron, even though it is precisely the micronutrient needed to moderate the overreaction. To compensate for the micronutrient deficiencies of the immune cells, the scientific team developed a lozenge which was tested for the first time in a double-blind fashion against a placebo within the framework of the study.

Bypass of iron absorption inhibition

The lozenge is based on cow beta-lactoglobulin whey protein, which acts as a carrier for many micronutrients. “Thanks to this transporter, absorption takes place via the lymph instead of the blood vessels, in other words, exactly where the immune cells are present in abundance, ensuring targeted absorption of micronutrients”, explains the head of the Franziska Roth-Walter study from the Messerli Research Institute. .

Since a tablet contains only a very small amount of iron, less than one milligram, it is not considered an iron supplement. Instead, the micronutrients are in a suitable form to be transported by whey protein beta-lactoglobulin and therefore to immune cells. According to the study results, supplementation with this lozenge significantly reduced the burden of symptoms in people allergic to birch and grass pollen.

In addition, after six months of intake, there was an identifiable improvement in iron status of circulating monocytes and red blood cell parameters. Supplementation with the lozenge resulted in a 45% reduction in the Combined Medication Symptom Score, a measure of symptoms and medication use, during the peak birch pollen season.

Reduce immune cell hypersensitivity

To date, specific allergen immunotherapy is considered the only causative treatment option for alleviating allergic diseases. This involves using an allergen specifically against the allergy in question, for example birch pollen against birch pollen allergy.

“The supply of immune cells with micronutrients via the lozenge showed surprisingly similar efficacy, but in a completely allergen-independent and therefore universal way”, specifies Franziska Roth-Walter. The study therefore presents a new approach in the care of people with allergies. In this approach, a dietary measure is used to reduce the underlying hypersensitivity of immune cells to allergenic substances rather than targeting the allergy itself.


Cow’s milk protein beta-lactoglobulin prevents allergies


More information:
Tina Bartosik et al, Improving atopy by compensating for micronutrient deficiencies in immune cells: a double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study, The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice (2022). DOI: 10.1016/j.jaip.2022.02.028

Provided by Medical University of Vienna


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Cold or allergy symptoms may be COVID https://deservedhealth.com/cold-or-allergy-symptoms-may-be-covid/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 19:24:04 +0000 https://deservedhealth.com/cold-or-allergy-symptoms-may-be-covid/ Gallagher is a Certified Senior Counselor and President of Senior Concerns, a nonprofit agency serving Ventura and West Los Angeles counties. For more information, visit seniorconcerns.org or email agallagher@seniorconcerns.org. Last week, my sister’s stepfather, who lives on the East Coast, was mowing his lawn. After he finished, he began to experience shortness of breath, attributing […]]]>

Gallagher is a Certified Senior Counselor and President of Senior Concerns, a nonprofit agency serving Ventura and West Los Angeles counties. For more information, visit seniorconcerns.org or email agallagher@seniorconcerns.org.

Last week, my sister’s stepfather, who lives on the East Coast, was mowing his lawn. After he finished, he began to experience shortness of breath, attributing it to the grass and weeds he had stirred up while mowing.

A few days later, his wife had a runny nose, cough and muscle aches. Suspecting her symptoms, she used one of her home COVID tests provided by her insurance and tested positive for coronavirus.

Believing now that he was responsible for passing it on to her, he reviewed all the people and places he had visited in the previous days: the church meeting he had attended, his visit to see his little -daughter and her great-grandchild, and her evening spent with the neighbours.

In all, he estimated he had come into close contact with more than 30 people.

He still hasn’t taken a COVID test, as he incorrectly concluded that it had been seven days since his first symptoms and that he was past the contagious stage. He only called his granddaughter to let her know his wife, and possibly him, had COVID.

Although vaccinations and boosters have made COVID a less extreme medical experience for most of us, these lesser symptoms can mimic a cold or allergies. With more of us on the go and reconnecting with others, it’s also entirely possible that we could just catch an old-fashioned cold in the process.

In most cases, transmitting a cold to someone is not life changing, but transmitting COVID even to someone vaccinated and boosted can be.

A very healthy middle-aged friend of mine recently contracted COVID after an in-person event she attended. Even though the venue’s doors and windows were open — and she was vaccinated — her COVID case was very serious.

Besides the normal symptoms we are talking about, she had cold sores around and inside her mouth. She had terrible back spasms and her hair started falling out.

Even 10 days after exposure, she still tested positive and felt terrible. After later seeing an ear, nose and throat doctor, she was told she had two residual infections from her bout with COVID.

While her doctor thought her infections would eventually clear up, he didn’t have a timeline for her full recovery.

Personally, I’m so over COVID. It has impacted my life and the licensing rules that we have had to follow here at Senior Concerns for far too long.

I would like to forget that it exists and continue to live normally. But I realize I can’t, in part because we’re seeing another wave, albeit less deadly than the previous ones.

Over the past three weeks, a few of my staff have had to quarantine because they were exposed to someone with COVID. A week ago, we had to temporarily suspend our adult day program to ensure the safety of our participants.

As I write this, I’m sitting in our 10,000 square foot building with only three of us answering the phone. It took 25 months for COVID to get to us, even after all the masking, cleaning, 6ft distancing and protocols we had to follow.

I don’t know if the COVID that is reaching us has more to do with the reopening of the world or the contagiousness of this recent strain.

What I’m grateful for is that while a few friends I know with COVID ended up in hospital and one in intensive care, all of them have started their recovery. It is a blessing.

If there’s a caveat here, it’s that a cold or headache allergy may spread more easily than you think and may not be a cold or allergy.

Every household in the United States is now eligible to order a third round of eight additional rapid and free COVID-19 home tests. For testing, go to covidtests.gov or call (800) 232-0233.

Your family, friends and neighbors will thank you for your diligence.

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Green tea allergy: symptoms, causes, diagnosis https://deservedhealth.com/green-tea-allergy-symptoms-causes-diagnosis/ Fri, 27 May 2022 13:27:25 +0000 https://deservedhealth.com/green-tea-allergy-symptoms-causes-diagnosis/ Tea (green, black and oolong) is considered one of the most popular beverages in the world. Green tea is ranked in the top three, thanks to its high antioxidant content. Although generally well tolerated, it may cause an allergic reaction in some people. This article explains the symptoms of a green tea allergy, how it […]]]>

Tea (green, black and oolong) is considered one of the most popular beverages in the world. Green tea is ranked in the top three, thanks to its high antioxidant content.

Although generally well tolerated, it may cause an allergic reaction in some people.

This article explains the symptoms of a green tea allergy, how it is diagnosed and treated, and healthy alternatives.

(Phethay Canthra Phun/EyeEm/Getty Images)


Health benefits of green tea

Some of the health benefits of green tea include:

Ongoing research examines green tea extract for preventing symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease and lowering cholesterol.

Green tea allergy symptoms

Like other allergies, a green tea allergy occurs when the immune system overreacts to an allergen by producing antibodies that trigger an allergic reaction.

Allergic reactions can cause symptoms in the ears, nose, throat, and sinuses. It can also cause symptoms on the skin and stomach lining.

Potential symptoms of an allergic reaction to green tea include:

What is anaphylaxis?

Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction that can be life threatening. Symptoms such as vomiting, swelling of the tongue or throat, and difficulty breathing come on suddenly and can progress quickly. For this reason, it requires immediate emergency attention.

Why does it happen

There is little information on green tea allergies. Research suggests that an allergy can be triggered by a tannin (natural compound) found in green tea called epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG).

Green tea also contains caffeine, which can trigger a reaction in someone with non-allergic caffeine intolerance or caffeine allergy.

However, a small study suggests it could also be triggered by tea leaf dust. Researchers looked at Japanese green tea factory workers who developed difficulty breathing, coughing, and loss of consciousness after ingesting green tea, oolong tea, or black tea. They also experienced symptoms after eating cakes or noodles containing green tea powder.

The study found that less than half of the participants had developed a food allergy due to inhaling green tea dust at work. Many participants with allergic reactions to green tea had consumed green tea in the past without difficulty.

Risk factors

For most adults, green tea is safe when consumed in moderation. However, the following people should consult their health care provider before drinking green tea:

  • pregnant people: Some research suggests that caffeine may reduce birth weight and height.
  • caffeine sensitivity: People sensitive to caffeine may experience irritability, anxiety, restlessness, or upset stomach after drinking green tea.
  • young children: Caffeine is not recommended for children under 12 years of age.

Green tea intolerance

Unlike a green tea allergy, an intolerance occurs in the digestive system. Intolerance can occur for several reasons, including:

  • Absence of certain digestive enzymes
  • Sensitivity to natural compounds in a food or drink
  • Sensitivity to certain food additives

How to Diagnose a Green Tea Allergy

If you suspect a green tea allergy, it’s important to see your healthcare provider or allergist for proper diagnosis and treatment.

To make the diagnosis, your healthcare provider:

  • Ask for detailed information about your medical history
  • Perform a physical examination
  • Perform proven allergy tests

Most diagnoses are confirmed by oral food challenges; However, more research is needed to develop a blood test to diagnose green tea allergy.

Tea Intolerance Symptoms

The symptoms of green tea sensitivity or intolerance are different from those of a tea allergy. If you have a green tea intolerance, you may experience:

  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Abdominal pain
  • Nervousness
  • Gas or bloating

Green tea allergy treatment

For mild symptoms, your healthcare provider may suggest over-the-counter (OTC) antihistamines, which can help reduce symptoms such as swelling, itching, and hives.

The best way to treat a green tea allergy is to not drink it. You may also need to avoid consuming other foods or beverages Camellia Sinensis, such as:

  • matcha tea
  • Black tea
  • Oolong tea

For a severe allergy that causes anaphylaxis, you will need epinephrine treatment (EpiPen), which must be with you at all times.

Alternatives to green tea

If you’re allergic to green tea, consider these alternatives, which have similar benefits:

  • Herbal teas
  • pomegranate juice
  • beet juice
  • Acai juice
  • Kombucha

Summary

Green tea is one of the healthiest beverages in the world. Although a green tea allergy is rare, it can still happen. Most green tea allergies are related to its compounds (tannins and caffeine). However, new studies suggest that a protein in green tea may also trigger an allergic reaction. Treatment often includes removing green tea from your diet.

A word from Verywell

Although rare, being diagnosed with a green tea allergy can be frustrating, especially if you enjoy it. The good news is that many alternatives can provide similar benefits. However, if you think you have an allergy or intolerance to green tea, you should speak with your health care provider or allergist.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Can you drink green tea before an allergy test?

    Prior to allergy testing, green tea and other supplements should be avoided for five to seven days.

  • Is green tea bad to drink every day?

    No, for people with no known allergies or intolerances, drinking green tea every day can benefit a person’s overall health.

  • Why do I have a sore throat after drinking green tea?

    The tannins in green tea can contribute to dry mouth and throat, leading to a sore throat.

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Symptoms, what to avoid and more https://deservedhealth.com/symptoms-what-to-avoid-and-more-4/ Wed, 25 May 2022 21:23:54 +0000 https://deservedhealth.com/symptoms-what-to-avoid-and-more-4/ Spinach is not a major food allergen, but some people are allergic to it. You may notice specific symptoms after eating spinach if you are allergic, such as gastrointestinal, nasal, respiratory, or skin issues. This article explains the symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of spinach allergy. Kseniya Ovchinnikova/Getty Images Spinach Allergy and Histamine Intolerance Link Although […]]]>

Spinach is not a major food allergen, but some people are allergic to it. You may notice specific symptoms after eating spinach if you are allergic, such as gastrointestinal, nasal, respiratory, or skin issues.

This article explains the symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of spinach allergy.

Kseniya Ovchinnikova/Getty Images


Spinach Allergy and Histamine Intolerance Link

Although histamine intolerance and food allergies share some symptoms, they are not the same thing. Histamine intolerance occurs when the body cannot process the high levels of histamine naturally found in certain foods. The inability to process histamine occurs when the enzymes your body needs to break down histamines are inhibited. As a result, histamine enters the bloodstream and causes symptoms.

On the other hand, food allergies are an abnormal reaction of the immune system to food. Symptoms occur when the body mistakenly identifies a food as a harmful substance and overproduces histamine.

What is histamine?

Histamine is a chemical that sends messages between cells. Primarily, it works with the immune system to protect your body against foreign substances. With allergies, the immune system overreacts to harmless substances, the allergens. When this happens, it produces excess histamine, leading to allergy symptoms.

Spinach is a histamine-rich food, which means it naturally contains high levels of histamine. Histamine intolerance is difficult to diagnose. Often, food allergies must first be ruled out. If your healthcare provider suspects histamine intolerance, they may recommend a low-histamine diet to see if that helps.

Symptoms

Like other food allergies, a spinach allergy can produce a wide range of symptoms. These include:

In addition to the typical symptoms above, food allergies can cause a more serious reaction called anaphylaxis. Symptoms include:

  • Hoarseness
  • Tightness in the throat
  • Wheezing
  • Difficulty breathing
  • A tingling sensation
  • A feeling of unhappiness

Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening medical emergency. Therefore, if you experience severe symptoms, call 911 or go to the emergency room immediately.

Diagnostic

Diagnosing food allergies may require a skin test, blood test, oral challenge, and food elimination test. Allergists and immunologists are physicians with specialized training in the diagnosis and treatment of allergies. They may be better equipped to help you diagnose a food allergy.

Skin test

Skin testing is considered the standard for diagnosing allergies. These tests introduce a potential allergen into your skin by scratching or injecting a small amount. A healthcare provider then monitors your skin for a reaction. Developing a rash, bump, or hives indicates an allergy to that substance.

Blood test

Blood tests are accurate and help when someone cannot tolerate a skin test. For example, young children may have difficulty sitting still and not scratching for a skin test. Blood tests look for immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies against different substances to confirm an allergy.

Oral challenge

Oral provocation involves ingesting suspect foods under medical supervision. Then, after eating or swallowing a small amount of the potential allergen, a healthcare professional watches for a reaction, which would indicate an allergy to that substance.

Elimination Diet

An elimination diet may be part of the facility if you have a food allergy or sensitivity. Usually, before eliminating one or more particular foods, a health professional will ask you to keep a food diary. In the diary, you will write down everything you eat and any symptoms you notice. Then, after a while (maybe a few weeks), you will reintroduce foods, noting any reoccurring symptoms.

Treatment

Treating a spinach allergy primarily involves avoiding spinach and foods that contain spinach as an ingredient. Also, medications can help with accidental exposure.

Antihistamines

As their name suggests, antihistamines block the chemical histamine. Therefore, they are the first-line treatment for allergic symptoms. Antihistamines are available over the counter (OTC) and by prescription.

Antihistamines come in either first- or second-generation forms. First-generation drugs are the oldest types of drugs. They tend to produce more side effects, such as sedation. First-generation antihistamines include:

Second-generation antihistamines produce fewer side effects. They understand:

  • Zyrtec (cetirizine)
  • Allegra (fexofenadine)
  • Clarinex (desloratadine)
  • Claritine, Alavert (loratadine)
  • Xyzal (levocetirizine)
  • Astelin, Astepro (azelastine)

Epinephrine

Epinephrine (EpiPen) is a hormone you use to treat anaphylaxis. The drug is generally offered to people who have a history of severe allergic reactions or an allergy to a substance known to be more likely to produce a severe reaction.

Spinach is generally not a life-threatening allergy; However, if you have a history of severe allergic reactions, your healthcare provider may advise you to keep an EpiPen on hand just in case.

What to avoid and food alternatives

Restricting your diet to avoid spinach is essential when you have a food allergy. So, in addition to avoiding spinach in its natural form, you’ll also need to be a detective when it comes to reading food labels and monitoring it as an ingredient.

Fortunately, spinach is not a common food additive. But, you might find it in things like dips, pasta and egg dishes, salads, and soups. When eating out, tell your server about your allergy to avoid the risk of cross-contamination.

Alternatives to spinach include vegetables like kale, Swiss chard, and salad greens.

When to See a Health Care Provider

If you suspect you may have a spinach allergy, you should be evaluated by a health care provider. Your primary care provider is a great place to start. They may be able to coordinate allergy testing or they can refer you to a specialist. Also, if you experience severe anaphylactic reactions, seek medical attention immediately.

Summary

Spinach allergy is not a major food allergy, but an allergy can still occur. Additionally, some histamine-intolerant people may react to eating spinach because it is a histamine-rich food. Allergy symptoms can include skin, gastrointestinal, nasal, and respiratory problems. A severe anaphylactic reaction is less common with spinach, but can occur with any allergy.

Diagnosis may involve tracking your diet and eliminating spinach, reintroducing it, and evaluating symptoms. Additionally, skin, oral, and blood tests can help identify the allergy.

A word from Verywell

If you are allergic to spinach, you will need to avoid spinach in all forms, including whole spinach and small amounts that may be hidden in other dishes. It’s also good to keep antihistamines on hand if you accidentally ingest spinach. Work with a health care provider to determine which medication is best for your situation.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What is the difference between spinach allergy and spinach intolerance?


  • Is spinach allergy more common in children than in adults?

    Food allergies are more common in children than in adults. However, anyone can develop a food allergy, including spinach, at any time in their life. Children are more likely to outgrow food allergies than those who develop them later in life.

  • Can you have an allergic reaction to raw but uncooked spinach?

    If you are allergic to spinach, your body’s immune system will react to the allergen, regardless of how the food is prepared. However, if you have histamine intolerance, the way a food is cooked can sometimes affect histamine levels. With spinach, however, research has shown that there is no difference in histamine levels depending on whether it is eaten raw or cooked.

  • Is spinach a common allergen?

    Spinach is not a common allergen. The main food allergens are milk, eggs, fish, shellfish, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat and soy.

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